Josh Klemm

International Rivers
Job title:
Policy Director
Tagline:
Greening public finance
Personal bio:
Working toward global rules to sustain rivers and protect communities in public finance.
Date: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 09:42
Last month, the World Bank signed away its legal obligation to protect Uganda’s Kalagala Falls, a site of immense spiritual and biodiversity value near the headwaters of the Nile River.
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:23
Earlier this month, the DRC government seemed to acknowledge what we have long argued: The proposed Inga 3 Dam, touted for decades as a fix-all to the country’s energy woes, is not a good investment.
Date: Monday, December 19, 2016 - 08:53
In June, I wrote about courageous colleagues from Niger who came to the World Bank’s headquarters in Washington to sound the alarm over some 60,000 people at risk of being displaced by the Kandadji Dam’s reservoir.
Date: Friday, October 14, 2016 - 05:16
The past two years have seen the World Bank begin to move away from large hydro in favor of new renewable energy. Does this signal a shift in the Bank's love affair with dams, and can other banks avoid the same pitfalls?
Date: Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 16:05
Activists visiting from West Africa warn that another World Bank dam project threatens to go off the rails. Will the Bank do right by the communities affected by the Kandadji Dam?
Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2016 - 13:59
Solar and wind power are experiencing a remarkable rise. So why is the World Bank's renewables lending still focused on large hydro? Part 2 of our three-part series on renewables.
Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 17:58
The term has been applied to everything from mini-hydro to mega-dams. So what does run-of-river mean and what are its impacts?
Date: Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 15:29
Niger's Kandadji Dam is supposed to alleviate poverty in the poorest region of Africa. But with resettlement already facing major problems, the future of the project is now in doubt.
Date: Monday, December 7, 2015 - 15:29
The World Bank has pledged to scale up its lending for climate change to $13 billion by 2020. But are the projects it's supporting actually addressing climate challenges?
Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 05:17
Last week, I attended the World Bank meetings in Lima to highlight the World Bank’s checkered history with financing large dams, and to push for more thorough and cleaner solutions.
Date: Friday, October 2, 2015 - 10:38
The World Bank will hold its Annual Meetings next week in Lima, in the face of stiff competition from new lenders like the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. The Bank will make the case that it has the know-how to responsibly build a new wave of dams and other mega-projects.
Date: Friday, April 24, 2015 - 13:21
As ministers, business leaders, NGOs and policymakers descended on Washington last week for the World Bank’s semi-annual high-level meetings, the Bank’s carefully cultivated image of respectability was tarnished by a damning new report on its role in financing large-scale evicti
Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 09:33
In early February the World Bank launched a report arguing in favor of energy projects – including large dams – that benefit mining companies in Africa as an effective way to deliver electricity to poor communities. But for the great majority of Sub-Saharan Africans who live in rural areas, traditional electrification will likely never be cost-effective. Unfortunately, the modest investments in decentralized energy and energy efficiency options that would best deliver access are overlooked in favor of megaprojects that require vast sums of money.
Date: Monday, March 2, 2015 - 15:21
In the World Bank’s board that thrives on consensus, the United States took the unusual step of voting against The International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) investment in the 108 MW Gulpur hydropower project on Pakistan’s Poonch River.
Date: Monday, January 26, 2015 - 13:25
The Inner Niger Delta in Mali is one of Africa’s largest wetlands, a verdant and biologically rich area bordering the Sahara Desert. In addition to hosting millions of migratory birds from Europe, the delta serves as a lifeline for anywhere between 1 and 2 million people who depend on its bounty for pastureland, flood recession agriculture and fishing.