International Rivers regularly publishes and distributes print materials with the purpose of informing and educating the public about issues related to rivers. All of our materials are available for free, and can be downloaded from our website and reprinted without restriction.

Women and Rivers


State of Knowledge: Women and Rivers in the Mekong Region (2020)

The State of Knowledge: Women and Rivers in the Mekong Region highlights women’s contributions—both actual and potential—to better governance, social, and environmental outcomes for rivers in the Mekong region. The report spotlights women’s achievements in water decision-making and river governance, but also the major barriers to their leadership and “visible” participation.

Transforming Power

A gender guide for organizations campaigning on dams and for rivers (2020)

Transforming Power, a gender guide for organizations campaigning on dams and for rivers was created as a tool to help CSOs, NGOs and grassroots community organizations  strengthen their gender practice and encourage campaigning in ways that are gender-responsive in the interests of both women and men.

Holding the Dam Industry Accountable


Review of the Design Changes of the Xayaburi Dam (2019)

In this report, International Rivers commissioned two experts to provide comments on the Mekong River Commission’s ‘Review of Design Changes Made for the Xayaburi Hydropower Project’ (the ‘MRC Review’), which was released in early 2019. The MRC Review examines information provided by the Government of Laos and the project developer about the redesign of the Xayaburi Hydropower Project. The MRC Review assessed this information against the findings and recommendations of the MRC’s original Xayaburi Technical Review Report (TRR), which was produced by the MRC during the Xayaburi Prior Consultation procedure.

Watered Down: Do big hydropower companies adhere to social and environmental policies and best practices? (2019)

This report provides context for this situation and features seven in-depth case studies of dams at final stages of completion. The intention of this report is to provide an incentive and justification for these corporations to compete on their environmental and social track records rather than simply on financial grounds.

Reckless Endangerment: Assessing Responsibility for the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy Dam Collapse (2019)

On July 23, 2018, an auxiliary dam of the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy Hydropower Project in Laos collapsed, unleashing a rushing wall of water that killed dozens of people and flooded thousands of homes and farms. The floodwaters reached into northern Cambodia, destroying crops and property some 80 kilometers away. On the anniversary of the dam collapse a this report examines the situation for survivors.

Dam Standards: A Rights-Based Approach (2014)

Dam Standards: A Rights-Based Approach attempts to summarize the strongest social and environmental standards related to each stage of a dam’s project cycle: from strategic planning, to project analysis, to implementation, operation, and dam decommissioning. The guide takes the position that the most effective standards are those that safeguard the rights of dam-affected people, avoid risks, and allow the public to hold governments, institutions, and companies accountable.

Sustainable Alternatives


Civil Society Guide to Healthy Rivers and Climate Resilience (2013)

Healthy rivers are critical for helping vulnerable communities adapt to a changing climate – protecting them now is a community’s health insurance policy for the future.  With the help of a number of partner organizations, we have developed the Civil Society Guide to Healthy Rivers and Climate Resilience.  Using case studies and examples from around the world, the guide answers questions that help assess, address, and adapt to a world of increasing climate risks.

Designing Low Carbon Electricity Futures for African and Other Developing Countries (2015)

This paper examines recent studies to assess the prospects for renewable energy development in developing countries, with a particular emphasis on African countries. Evidence shows large potential for wind and solar resources, and opportunities for their development with low social and environmental impacts. Critical to the discussion are the emerging strategies that are being deployed around the world to efficiently manage the variability and uncertainty of large-scale grid-connected wind and solar energy generation.

An Introduction to Integrated Resources Planning (2013)

Integrated Resources Planning (IRP) is a public process in which planners work together with other interested parties to identify and prepare energy options that serve the highest possible public good. This guide to Integrated Resource Planning introduces the IRP concept, contrasts it with conventional practices of power sector planning, and explains the IRP process step by step. The report also includes best practice examples from the United States and other countries. 

Regional Campaigns


The True Cost of Hydropower in China (2014)

The True Cost of Hydropower report demonstrates that it is possible for China to reduce its carbon emissions without increased hydropower exploitation. Supported by the Energy Transition Research Institute (ENTRI), the report presents an electricity sector development model for China which only allows for a very limited increase in hydropower generation to conserve China’s magnificent south-west rivers. The ENTRI model shows that with ambitious investments in renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, the country can massively reduce carbon emissions, protect its rivers and reduce economic costs at the same time.

Strategic Environmental Assessment of the Myanmar Hydropower Sector: Discussion Brief (2018)

This brief introduces the Strategic Environmental Assessment of the Myanmar Hydropower Sector and seeks to generate dialogue, including around the study’s process, findings and recommendations. The brief offers perspectives on the assessment’s outcomes—outlining the limitations and concerns with the assessment as well as ways its analysis and recommendations can be used to support a more equitable, inclusive, rights-based and environmentally sound future for Myanmar’s rivers and energy systems.