An urgent call to protect Brazil’s human rights and environmental defenders

An urgent call to protect Brazil’s human rights and environmental defenders

By: Brent Millikan, Latin America Program Director In response to the brutal assassination of Dilma Ferreira Silva, a leader of Brazil’s Movement of Dam-Affected Peoples (MAB) in the area impacted by the notorious Tucuruí hydroelectric dam, a joint statement drafted by International Rivers and AIDA, and co-signed by over 100 human rights and environmental organizations from 25 countries,…

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Women’s rights and river protection

Women’s rights and river protection

By: Maureen Harris, Programs Director This article was originally featured on Asia Times Usually at this time of year during the dry season in northern Thailand, the Mekong River recedes, and sand and pebble beaches appear. Covering the pebbles, through the clear and shallow water, one can see the pale green kai, a river weed of…

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IN THE NEWS | Women must be central to Mekong dam decisions

IN THE NEWS | Women must be central to Mekong dam decisions

By: Maureen Harris, Programs Director Originally published on Bangkok Post Today, on International Women’s Day, a recent trip to the Mekong Basin serves as a reminder that women’s voices must be central to decision-making on hydropower, and in broader energy planning for Thailand and the region. The Nam Ou River, a longest tributary of the…

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Goal 4 – Secure Human Rights for River Communities and Water Protectors

Goal 4 – Secure Human Rights for River Communities and Water Protectors

By: Sarah Bardeen, Former Communications Director In recent years, the silencing, disappearance and assassination of environmental and indigenous defenders has become tragically common.  Perhaps the most high-profile case involves Berta Caceres, our friend and partner who was gunned down in her own home in Honduras for her opposition to the Agua Zarca Dam on the…

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The Women of Inga: A Portrait of Resilience

The Women of Inga: A Portrait of Resilience

“Go and tell them that we, the women of Inga, are suffering” By: Ange Asanzi, former Africa Program Associate One thing is for certain: the women of Inga are self-sufficient. They grow avocados, oranges, bananas, cassava, nuts and beans. They harvest medicinal plants to tend to their sick. Nearly everything they consume comes from their…

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River Defenders Gather Forces in Georgia

River Defenders Gather Forces in Georgia

By: Kate Horner, former Executive Director & Igor Vejnovic This article originally appeared on Open Democracy. This week, activists from across the world are meeting in Tbilisi to share their experiences of resisting hydropower projects and the money that supports them. Free-flowing rivers are often the unsung heroes of the natural world. They support immense biodiversity, as…

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Indigenous Activists: In the Crosshairs of Development

Indigenous Activists: In the Crosshairs of Development

By: Peter Bosshard, former Executive Director This commentary first appeared in Mongabay  When we learned that Berta Cáceres, a leader of the indigenous Lenca people, was murdered in Honduras, we were shocked but not surprised. A violent death is the all-too-frequent fate of indigenous activists who defend their rivers and lands against dams, logging and other forms of…

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The Mortal Danger of Opposing a Dam

The Mortal Danger of Opposing a Dam

By: Sarah Bardeen, former Communications Director In Sudan last week, dozens of peaceful protesters were injured when Sudanese police used force to break up a protest against the Kajbar and Dal dams. For some, it was deja vu – a painful echo of 2006-07, when Sudanese security forces took the lives of at least seven people who…

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Human Rights Must Come First

Human Rights Must Come First

By: Zachary Hurwitz In some countries, dams are being built without the basic protection of human rights. In Sarawak, Malaysia, the Murum Dam was built before even its environmental impact assessment was published or discussed with affected communities. In Brazil, the Belo Monte Dam was approved by the government in 2005 even before an EIA had been written in 2008;…

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Human Rights and Kyoto’s Carbon Offsetting Scheme

Human Rights and Kyoto’s Carbon Offsetting Scheme

By: Katy Yan Update: Twelve civil society organizations, including International Rivers, have sent letters to the United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the UN Independent Expert on Human Rights and the Environment urging them to conduct formal investigations into the human rights impacts of the Barro Blanco dam located on the Tabasará River in Panama. The…

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